2nd Annual Childhood Injury Summit, September 16, 2010 Small Group Strategic Discussion Notes

QUESTION 1
What stands out with the data (any surprises/news/insights)? What could we do differently to be more effective in using data to tell the story of childhood unintentional injury in Minnesota?

  • Difference in ethnicity and racial injuries and how they are treated. Eye opening and useful.
  • Importance of supervision at pools.
  • Motor vehicle traffic down and falls up (because of seniors).
  • Provide useful analogies. Take numbers and make more relatable.
  • Make data more realistic and personal with smaller numbers and comparisons (i.e. 1 in 4 instead of 100 in 40,000; How many deaths/injuries since we’ve been in this meeting?)
  • Texting and driving – knowledge versus behavior.
  • How can we use data for our specific cause? Give examples on how to report or get numbers.
  • Where can we get specific information on each of our causes?
  • Three ways to humanize/report back to the group.
  • Helicopter parents versus moms and dads working part-time – no opportunities – how do we do both? Changes in parenting over the last 30 years.
  • Parenting perceptions based on fear rather than data (Jacob Wetterling era).
  • Data isn’t necessarily new – do parents care about those specifics or do we use them? Can we use those internally and use other facts (consequences) instead?
  • Use the state for local data – but what do we do with it? Some need data for work.
  • Showing the consequences – translate data into social math (empty classrooms = 30 kids). Use numbers people can relate to and create an emotional attachment.
  • Use one powerful message (i.e. binge drinking – most are NOT doing this – skewed perceptions of data. Use the positive.)
  • Pockets of health and injury – the disparities are great!
  • We need to tell personal stories.
  • Make videos – post on YouTube, etc.
  • New insights on drowning and falls.
  • Share reports between trauma centers.
  • Ride coattails of current news events and collaborate with other agencies to send out parallel messages.
  • Sports: More recognition needed regarding incidences.
  • Youth athletic associations – they get little training. Important to provide TBI, etc. messages to them.
  • More focus needed on ATV safety for recreational use. Craft safety messages
  • We need the data to get legislation passed.
  • Local data can be found through trauma centers. Trauma centers have access to their own data – for crashes, can get BACs, seat belt use, position in vehicle; also non-fatal injury data.
  • Other ways the data could be cut that would be helpful: by zip code, race and income level
  • Ways to humanize the data: high profile stories in media (e.g. garage door openers); use of personal stories in legislative testimony; present with high impact such as the anti-smoking ads that ran on TV last year that made the cost very personal; also the MADD ads that included home video of people who had been killed by drunk drivers. Need dollars to mount effective media campaigns.
QUESTION 2
What could we do differently to support trusted sources (i.e. pediatricians, home visiting nurses, and others) in effectively reaching parents to increase their understanding of child development and injury prevention?
  • Give easy referrals at physician level. Provide scripts and developmental information to people who really have an interest in child safety (pediatricians) to help get info out to parents and kids.
  • People put a lot of respect in doctors – how do we give them the messages?
  • Can a health plan encourage injury prevention methods rather than doctors?
  • Offer health plan incentives.
  • Encourage insurance groups to charge people more for not wearing a helmet? Cheaper life insurance rates if a person is safer?
  • How do we encourage people to change? Do we spend marketing dollars on those that are affected? (Like people who have had a bike incident with no helmet?)
  • Not having the dollars to spend on car seats/helmets is an issue.
  • Harriet Tubman Center – safety planning model on chemical health, mental health, persons with TBI/disability.
  • Do counties have consortia that meet access disciplines?
  • Child development demands – milestones.
  • Provide these groups with current, accurate information.
  • Where are pediatric conferences, how can we integrate and disseminate accurate info?
  • Do more with fathers; so often education is totally focused on mothers. Males often set the standard for the family – if they say “don’t do it,” it won’t be done.
  • What if pediatricians have the wrong information? How do we keep them up to date? – They don’t have the time to immerse in this.
  • Work with AAP leadership to provide information. For example, “safe sleep” – it helped when AAP came out with a policy statement.
  • More education about unintentional injury for docs when they are in medical school.
  • Build collaborative networks between trusted sources and injury prevention professionals to allow more information flow. Support collaborations between programs and professional associations. Deal with competition between hospitals. Get execs from hospitals together.
  • Develop other ways to provide information, not just at doctor visits – they’re doing so much already.
  • Provide more support and information for public health nurses.
  • Is there an opportunity for more parental education after birth in hospital?
  • 12 YouTube components.
  • Watch Me Grow scrapbook
  • Partner more closely with ECHO.
  • Add safety as a topic in pre-natal classes.
  • Raise parents’ consciousness about assessing child care providers from a safety perspective.
  • Work with health plans (they already provide car seats to Medicaid enrollees).
  • Look to additional trusted sources in faith communities; among social workers.
  • Support a leadership structure at the local level for injury prevention. Could there be something comparable to “block club leaders” for injury prevention at the grass roots level, in immigrant communities, etc.
  • Give informational resources to send parents to.
  • Empower doctors to say “I don’t know” and direct parent to a resource.
  • Language issues – provide resources and continue to refer.
  • Parent’s knowledge: change perception of injury prevention reps (safety people viewed as ‘know it alls’).
  • How to reach parents/professionals without being overwhelming?
  • We want to help and not villanize parents and point out all the scary things.
  • How do we empower/train parents to advocate for their children’s safety?
  • Safety checklists.
QUESTION 3
What could we do differently to be more effective in creating culturally comprehensive childhood injury prevention programs and services to reach underserved communities?
  • Assess and understand cultural regions, differences, beliefs, communication and appropriate customs.
  • Spend time in the cultural communities. Assess needs and behaviors – listen to community members. See the community member, build a trusting relationship, reduce barriers.
  • Identify current resources in the community and utilize those versus reinventing the wheel.
  • Translate the message - printed materials, ethnic media, events.
  • Utilize age appropriate community members within the culture to deliver the message with and/or for us as a champion for a cause.
  • Realize and utilize all professionals, the less “in the spotlight” resource people (parish nurses) and peer support, coordinators of other groups or a network.
  • Important to work as a collaborative team.
  • Coincide with pre-organized community events.
  • Set clear, simple expectations.
  • Learn to see people. Listen. Respect.
  • Establish relationships with and use other established avenues – i.e. community groups and organizations to increase awareness, and deliver our message.
  • Promoting safe play versus injury prevention.
  • Partner with ECHO to most effectively provide pediatric safety messages in an appropriate form.
  • Examine dangers in specific communities; have to know the community.
  • Who are the trusted sources (individuals and programs)? Build trusting relationships. Ownership has to come from the community.
  • Be alert to our own internal biases.
  • Collaborate with one another and communities.
  • Collaborate with childcare providers.
  • Utilize sports connections.
  • Boys and Girls/Big Brothers/Big Sisters
  • Park and Rec
  • Risk Watch: St. Paul FD – St. Paul Fun Nights
  • Find a hero in community to get the message out.
  • Focus on milestones in a child’s life and use strategic partnerships to make it easy to get info out at a relevant time.
  • Pre-script info to hand out – tailor it to fit for different cultures.
  • More marketing messages in the places where people live and work and play.
  • Pre-school screenings? Are there options to get info out through school nurses?
QUESTION 4
What could we do differently to be more effective in promoting injury prevention through health plans, organizational practices and state/local/organizational policies?
  • Health plans:
    • More focus on injury prevention rather than just wellness.
    • With health care reform, will incentives shift? (for example, with the removal of the cap on benefits)
    • Accept prescriptions for prevention devices such as bike helmets
  • Organizations: - Organizations that work with kids (scouts, the Y, etc.) – do they have policies that focus on injury prevention? Are they high profile policies?
  • Legislative policies:
    • Pass a bike helmet law
    • Enhance the CPS law
    • GDL could be stricter
  • Other:
    • Generate media attention through campaigns, to build support for policy initiatives. Work with “local heroes” e.g., Twins and Vikings
  • Universally designed policies and practices.
  • Health Plans: include injury prevention messaging and PSAs on web sites of health plans.
  • Wellness approaches via email and text messages.
  • For new policy holders, make aware of incentives (i.e. gift cards) to attend seminar; attend a health club for a period of time, then get some incentive. Apply concept to car seat safety, bike, drowning and home safety.
  • Organizational practice: new bike helmet for those in a bike crash. Give helmets to parents or to whole family.
  • Promote CPR, fire extinguishers, home safety supplies, etc. for employees and their families.
  • Find venues where HMOs are participating and try to send out messages regarding pediatric safety.
  • Participate in task forces.
  • Be thankful for what we have.
  • Educate parent to go above and beyond law.
  • Can a health plan encourage injury prevention methods rather than the doctors?
  • Offer health plan incentives.
  • Encourage insurance groups to charge more for not wearing a helmet? Cheaper life insurance rates if a person is safer?
QUESTION 5
What could we do differently utilizing new technologies/tools to be more effective in reaching kids, parents and other key groups?
  • Increase social networks (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube).
  • Utilize local, well known figure as a spokesperson.
  • Speakers Bureau? Create a common clearing house for public safety displaying/speaking opportunities (linked in via the MN Safety Council Web site?).
  • Utilize Safe Kids LinkedIn to reach professionals.
  • Expand Text4Baby program; add toddler years.
  • Know your audience and what they’re using (e.g., stats given in presentation about use of mobile devices by different ethnic groups).
  • Be careful not to abandon what’s effective.
  • Use multiple tools. Repeat the message from multiple sources and tools.
  • Work with school systems (one example: health fair day at school).
  • Many kids are a lot smarter about injury prevention than ten years ago (because parents are more knowledgeable).
  • There’s potential for use of social networking, but in a lot of settings, it’s blocked.
  • Text 4 Baby – great idea! People are using this. A father version would be great.
  • Social media restrictions in the workplace – cannot update.
  • Where do you get the funds from?
  • If we do a great job – how do you know?
  • Collaborate on media – refer a friend to the site and get a bonus.
  • Use video tools.
  • Have kids involved at every stage to help their peers.
  • Employee bike helmet sale – huge impact. Use networks to collectively share (i.e. bike helmet sale in March).
  • Facebook a new group
  • Blogs
  • Portal pages at college level
  • Text messages (Jr. High level)
  • Tweets
  • YouTube videos
  • LinkedIn
  • Pop ups on school computers
  • Competitions for teens using key messages.
  • PSAs on MN Department of Education website.
  • Materials on flash drives.
Childhood Injury Prevention Summit, September 17, 2009, speaker presentations
Childhood Injury Prevention Resources